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Report | Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center

Blocking the Sun

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News Release | Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center

Americans for Prosperity backing attacks on solar energy in Colorado, report says

DENVER, CO. - A national network of utility interest groups and fossil-fuel industry-funded think tanks is providing funding, model legislation, and political cover for anti-solar campaigns across the country, and would-be solar power owners will pay the price, said a new report by Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center.

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Blog Post

A silver lining to a toxic orange legacy? | Russell Bassett

The toxic mining spill in the Animas River made international news, but it also helped highlight a problem that is long overdue for a solution. Hard rock metal mining is the most destructive industry in the world. The mining industry should not be allowed to use our public lands to build new mines in and around our cherished waterways until it cleans up from past mining operations.

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Report | Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center

Summer Fun Index

Clean water is at the heart of summertime fun for millions of Coloradans. We swim at a favorite creek, fish in a nearby river, sail or kayak on the lake, or simply hike along a beautiful stream. As the summer draws to a close, Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center’s second annual Summer Fun Index provides a numerical snapshot of people engaging in water activities.

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News Release | Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center

Report: Action on Global Warming in Colorado Critical to the Future of the Outdoors and Outdoor Industry

Durango, CO –Colorado is poised to play a major role in U.S. progress to address climate change, a new report said today. In the next decade, the state will cut an amount of global warming pollution equivalent to adding 4,800 wind turbines to its energy infrastructure, helping to mitigate global warming impacts like fire and drought on the outdoor recreation industry in the state. 

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